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Object ID 2009.040.0020
Object Name Patch
Date circa 1990
Description Cloth patch with a rounded top and square body. The top is black with the words "CHEYENNE / SALOON" embroidered in brown. Beneath this is a white area with three men riding horses holding guns in the area embroidered in the center. The bottom portion has a brown background with "ORLANDO * FLORIDA * USA" embroidered in white.
Provenance Sold as a souvenir at Church Street Station.
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The illustration on the Cheyenne Saloon logo is based on the Remington sculpture "Coming through the Rye." per Rick Kilby, former employee.
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Church Street Station is a commercial development in downtown Orlando, Florida, spanning both sides of Church Street and both sides of CSX's A Line tracks, just east of I-4. At least one of the buildings was formerly used by the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad for their Orlando station. Amtrak now stops about a mile (1.6 km) south of downtown (see Orlando (Amtrak station)). The Seaboard Air Line Railroad station was two blocks north of Church Street, at Central Boulevard (see Orlando (SAL station)).

The Development saw its greatest popular success operated as an attraction offering admission to multiple nightclubs (of various formats) facilitating "club hopping" for a single price in a monolithic location. Walt Disney World emulated the successful formula, opening its own Pleasure Island club district amidst Church Street Station's peak years of success. The attraction's developer proceeded to develop a similar venue in Las Vegas, "Main Street Station" that at inception shared many club concepts with the Orlando facility.

As an attraction, Church Street Station eventually experienced a steep decline in attendance and had largely closed as a club-hop by the end of the 1990s.

Several attempts have been made by multiple owners to re-create the success of the mid-80s. Today there is a relatively new improv venue in what used to be a restaurant. The area immediately around the station is slated to become downtown apartments.

With foreclosures and serial disappointments duplicating the successes of the past, the future of the development remains questionable. A source of probable stimulus will likely occur with the new Amway Center. Across Interstate 4, Orlando's new entertainment arena is being constructed on Church Street, within close walking distance of Church Street Station. The arena, home to the Orlando Magic of the NBA, is slated to open in Fall 2010.[1] In addition, SunRail plans to revive the station as a commuter rail stop.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_Street_Station_(Orlando)
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UPDATED: 6:20 am EDT March 16, 2009

ORLANDO, Fla. -- Saturday night was the end of an era for an Orlando landmark.

The Cheyenne Saloon closed to the public -- another victim of the struggling economy.

During the 1980s, the saloon was the heart of Church Street Station -- a popular destination for tourists and locals.

Cheyenne closed in 2001 but reopened a little more than a year ago as part of the Church Street revitalization.

Saturday night, a band played and regulars over the years came to say goodbye.

Michael Daye showed a photograph he had taken in the saloon nearly 30 years ago. Back then, Church Street was a different sight.

"It was just packed," he said. "(There were) people out on the street, on the balconies."

Now a little more than a year after a refurbished Cheyenne Saloon reopened, the huge facility that could hold more than 1,000 people closed its doors.

"It's very sad, very said," said general manager Larry Stafford. "I was very excited when we reopened."

Stafford also held the general manager spot in 1982 when the saloon first opened.

The saloon will stay open for private parties, but that's it for now.

"The phone has just been ringing off the hook with people wanting to book special events," Stafford said.

The combination of the property owner being foreclosed on, nearby condos never opening, parking complaints and a stadium that's still being built are all reasons for the closure.

"It's just the times," Daye said. "People don't have the money."

http://www.wesh.com/news/18935724/detail.html
Material Cloth
Dimensions H-3.25 W-2.25 inches
Height (in) 3.25
Width (in) 2.25
Imagefile 036\20090400020.JPG